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Publication Information

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Title: Specific gravity relationships in plantation-grown red pine

Author: Baker, Gregory; Shottafer, James E.

Date: 1968

Source: In: Proceedings of the Eighth Lake States Forest Tree Improvement Conference; Res. Pap. NC-23. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Forest Service, North Central forest Experiment Station. 15-19

Publication Series: Research Paper (RP)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Norway or red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) has been popular in Maine for forest planting because it will rapidly convert grass and weed cover to a forest floor and because it is relatively free from attack by insects and diseases. Since the first commercial thinnings consist of small-sized trees, the most logical market outlet is for pulpwood. Yield of pulp fiber by weight is directly correlated with the specific gravity of the wood. Consequently, several questions arise: What is the average specific gravity of plantation red pine of a given age? Can the tree specific gravity for young, plantation-grown red pine be predicted satisfactorily by the technique used in predicting tree specific gravity of mature, natural-grown red pine? How do some of the variables encountered affect specific gravity of red pine plantations of the same age? A method of estimating tree specific gravity from increment cores taken at breast height has been reported in numerous publications and for several species of trees. In most cases the method has been applied to mature, natural-grown trees. A McIntyre-Stennis financed pilot study was initiated to test this method on young, plantation-grown red pine, and to study such other variables as could be measured without adding significantly to the cost of the study.

Publication Notes:

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Citation:


Baker, Gregory; Shottafer, James E. 1968. Specific gravity relationships in plantation-grown red pine. In: Proceedings of the Eighth Lake States Forest Tree Improvement Conference; Res. Pap. NC-23. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Forest Service, North Central forest Experiment Station. 15-19

 


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