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Publication Information

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Title: Effect of acorn mass and size, and early shoot growth on one-year old container-grown RPM™ oak seedlings

Author: Grossman, Benjamin C.; Gold, Michael A.; Dey, Daniel C.

Date: 2003

Source: In: Van Sambeek, J. W.; Dawson, Jeffery O.; Ponder Jr., Felix; Loewenstein, Edward F.; Fralish, James S., eds. Proceedings of the 13th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-234. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 405-414

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of seed source, acorn mass and size, and early shoot growth on morphological traits of 1-year-old oak seedlings. Forested bottomlands in the Midwest have been greatly reduced in the past 150 years as a result of conversion to agriculture and recent catastrophic floods. Due to a lack of available hard mast, intense competition from other riparian pioneer species and heavy animal pressure, natural regeneration and bare-rooted plantings of oak and other hard mast species along the lower Missouri River have had limited success. One viable option may lie in the use of root production method (RPM™) container-grown oak seedlings. Analysis of main treatment effects (i.e., heavy vs. light acorns) determined that Quercus x schuettei seedlings originating from heavy acorns were significantly larger than seedlings from light acorns. Main treatment effects on Quercus bicolor were analyzed and small acorns were found to have significantly larger seedling height and root volume than large acorns. Based on our findings, when seedlings are grown under optimal conditions for the production of high quality nursery seedlings, it is advantageous to retain and sow all acorns without screening for size or weight.

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Citation:


Grossman, Benjamin C.; Gold, Michael A.; Dey, Daniel C. 2003. Effect of acorn mass and size, and early shoot growth on one-year old container-grown RPM™ oak seedlings. In: Van Sambeek, J. W.; Dawson, Jeffery O.; Ponder Jr., Felix; Loewenstein, Edward F.; Fralish, James S., eds. Proceedings of the 13th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-234. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 405-414

 


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