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Title: Evaluation and process development of salt cedar and juniper biocomposites as tools to utilize exotic and invasive species and restore native ecosystems

Author: Winandy, Jerrold E.; Clemons, Craig M.; Stark, Nicole M.; Muehl, James H.; Williams, R. Sam

Date: 2005

Source: 3rd International Workshop on Green Composites, Japanese Society of Material Science, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, March 16-17, 2005. [S.l.] : The Society, 2005. Pages 56-60.

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: This research program is developing and evaluating potential value-added uses for a variety of exotic invasive woody species, such as salt cedar (Tamarisk spp.), one-seed juniper (Juniperus monosperma), and eastern red- cedar (Juniperus virginiana). Because each of these species is encroaching into America's natural indigenous ecosystems, land managers need tools to off-set the costs to control or eliminate them. In most cases, exotic- invasive species are removed from rangeland by using bulldozers and chains, piled and then burned. Such harvesting and burning in itself has significant costs in watershed damage, erosion and air pollution. Attempts to utilize most of these problem species have been extremely limited. One potential method to help promote control and elimination of exotic- invasive species, such as salt cedar and juniper fiber and thereby promote natural rangeland restoration, is to develop new value-added uses for them. Such attempts at value-added utilization will defray the cost of removing them from these arid eco-systems, which may in turn enable subsequent restoration of less water-demanding native flora. This report will describe our recent work to address these problems.

Keywords: Composites, wood-plastic composites, utilization, exotic-invasive species, ecosystem restoration

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Winandy, Jerrold E.; Clemons, Craig M.; Stark, Nicole M.; Muehl, James H.; Williams, R. Sam 2005. Evaluation and process development of salt cedar and juniper biocomposites as tools to utilize exotic and invasive species and restore native ecosystems. 3rd International Workshop on Green Composites, Japanese Society of Material Science, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, March 16-17, 2005. [S.l.] : The Society, 2005. Pages 56-60.

 


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