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Publication Information

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Title: Container Seedling Handling and Storage in the Southeastern States

Author: Dumroese, Kasten R.; Barnett, James P.

Date: 2004

Source: In: Riley, L. E.; Dumroese, R. K.; Landis, T. D., tech coords. National proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations—2003; 2003 June 9–12; Coeur d’Alene, ID; and 2003 July 14–17; Springfield, IL. Proc. RMRS-P-33. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station.

Publication Series: Not categorized

Description: Most container seedlings grown in the southeastern US are outplanted during winter, although 10 to 20% are outplanted during summer. Longleaf pine accounts for more than 80% of all container seedlings produced. Very little information is published on cold hardiness and storage effects on container-grown southern pines and hardwoods. In general, growers attempt to minimize storage time by coordinating extraction with outplanting, particularly during summer outplanting. Seedlings are hand extracted and placed into wax-coated boxes with slits or holes in the sides, either with or without a plastic liner, and placed into cooler storage. Seedlings for summer outplanting are generally stored at 40 to 70 oF (4 to 21 oC) but usually for a week or less. Seedlings extracted in winter (November through January) are kept at cooler temperatures (35 to 50 oF [2 to 10 oC]), sometimes for as long as 3 months. Research on cold hardiness development would be helpful in understanding proper storage conditions and lengths for southern pines.

Keywords: longleaf pine, slash, loblolly, Pinus palustris, P. elliottii, P. taeda, cold hardiness, hardwoods, research

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Dumroese, Kasten R.; Barnett, James P. 2004. Container Seedling Handling and Storage in the Southeastern States. In: Riley, L. E.; Dumroese, R. K.; Landis, T. D., tech coords. National proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations—2003; 2003 June 9–12; Coeur d’Alene, ID; and 2003 July 14–17; Springfield, IL. Proc. RMRS-P-33. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station.

 


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