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Title: Predicting abundance of 80 tree species following climate change in the Eastern United States

Author: Iverson, Louis R.; Prasad, Anantha M.; Prasad, Anantha M.

Date: 1998

Source: Ecological Monographs. 68(4): 465-485.

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: Projected climate warming will potentially have profound effects on the earth?s biota, including a large redistribution of tree species. We developed models to evaluate potential shifts for 80 individual tree species in the eastern United States. First, environmental factors associated with current ranges of tree species were assessed using geographic information systems (GIS) in conjunction with regression tree analysis (RTA). The method was then extended to better understand the potential of species to survive and/or migrate under a changed climate. We collected, summarized, and analyzed data for climate, soils, land use, elevation, and species assemblages for .2100 counties east of the 100th meridian. Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) data for .100 000 forested plots in the East provided the tree species range and abundance information for the trees. RTA was used to devise prediction rules from current species?environment relationships, which were then used to replicate the current distribution as well as predict the future potential distributions under two scenarios of climate change with twofold increases in the level of atmospheric CO2. Validation measures prove the utility of the RTA modeling approach for mapping current tree importance values across large areas, leading to increased confidence in the predictions of potential future species distributions. With our analysis of potential effects, we show that roughly 30 species could expand their range and/or weighted importance at least 10%, while an additional 30 species could decrease by at least 10%, following equilibrium after a changed climate. Depending on the global change scenario used, 4?9 species would potentially move out of the United States to the north. Nearly half of the species assessed (36 out of 80) showed the potential for the ecological optima to shift at least 100 km to the north, including seven that could move .250 km. Given these potential future distributions, actual species redistributions will be controlled by migration rates possible through fragmented landscapes.

Keywords: climate change, envelope analysis, forest inventory, geographic information systems, GIS, global change, landscape ecology, predictive vegetation mapping, regression tree analysis, RTA, species?environment relationships, tree species distribution, tree species migration, tree species ranges

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Citation:


Iverson, Louis R.; Prasad, Anantha M. 1998. Predicting abundance of 80 tree species following climate change in the Eastern United States. Ecological Monographs. 68(4): 465-485.

 


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