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Publication Information

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Title: Do pine trees in aspen stands increase bird diversity?

Author: Rumble, Mark A.; Flake, Lester D.; Mills, Todd R.; Dykstra, Brian L.

Date: 2001

Source: In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Binkley, Dan; Bartos, Dale L.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Eskew, Lane G., comps. Sustaining aspen in western landscapes: Symposium proceedings; 13-15 June 2000; Grand Junction, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-18. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 185-192.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: In the Black Hills of South Dakota, quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is being replaced by conifers through fire suppression and successional processes. Although the Black Hills National forest is removing conifers (primarily ponderosa pine [Pinus ponderosa]) to increase the aspen communities in some mixed stands, Forest Plan guidelines allow four conifers per hectare to remain to increase diversity in the remaining aspen stand. We compared bird species richness in pure ponderosa pine, mixed stands dominated by ponderosa pine with quaking aspen, mixed stands dominated by aspen with ponderosa pine, and pure aspen stands. Stands dominated by ponderosa pine had lower (P <0.01) bird species richness than stands dominated by aspen, Aspen in ponderosa pine stands or pine in aspen stands did not increase bird species richness (P >0.68) over the respective pure stands. Thus, leaving ponderosa pine in aspen stands will not have the desired effect of increasing bird diversity but may have the negative effect of speeding successional processes that rep/ace aspen with conifers.

Keywords: Populus tremuloides, Pinus ponderosa, birds, species richness, mixed forests, Black Hills, South Dakota

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Citation:


Rumble, Mark A.; Flake, Lester D.; Mills, Todd R.; Dykstra, Brian L. 2001. Do pine trees in aspen stands increase bird diversity? In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Binkley, Dan; Bartos, Dale L.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Eskew, Lane G., comps. Sustaining aspen in western landscapes: Symposium proceedings; 13-15 June 2000; Grand Junction, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-18. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 185-192.

 


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