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Title: Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire

Author: Finney, Mark A.; Bartlette, Roberta; Bradshaw, Larry; Close, Kelly; Collins, Brandon M.; Gleason, Paul; Hao, Wei Min; Langowski, Paul; McGinely, John; McHugh, Charles W.; Martinson, Erik; Omi, Phillip N.; Shepperd, Wayne; Zeller, Karl

Date: 2003

Source: In: Graham, Russell T., Technical Editor. Hayman Fire Case Study. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-114. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 33-35

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The Hayman Fire started on June 8, 2002, about 1.5 miles southwest of Tappan Mountain on the south side of County Highway 77, in Park County, Colorado (fig. 1). It was first reported at about 1 acre in size at approximately 1655 hours (appendix C). An aggressive initial attack response consisted of air tankers, helicopters, engines, and ground crews, but they were unable to contain the fire. Torching trees and prolific spotting advanced the fire to the northeast across U.S. Highway 77 by 1831 hours. The entire Front Range of Colorado was predisposed to potential extreme fire behavior by the unusually severe drought conditions this year. The unusual moisture conditions were exemplified by the low moisture contents (3 to 7 percent) of large dead woody fuels (100 hour, 1000 hour) and duff, and conifer foliage (84 to 111 percent). Little or no new growth appeared on perennial grasses and brush, and terminal buds did not elongate or flush on some conifers. Weather at the time of ignition consisted of high winds (from the south averaging 18 mph, with gusts to 33, Lake George RAWS station, appendix A) and low humidity (9 percent) that facilitated rapid fire spread rates, crown fire, and spotting. Fuels across the landscape were generally continuous, with no recent wildfires or fuel management activities occurring downwind of the ignition location for perhaps 10 miles. Surface fuels generally consisted of ponderosa pine duff and needle litter, short grass, and occasional patches of brush. Low crowns of the predominating conifer species (ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and blue spruce) facilitated transition from surface to crown fire.

Keywords: Hayman Fire, wildfire, fuel treatments, behavior, suppression, Tappan Mountain, Colorado

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Finney, Mark A.; Bartlette, Roberta; Bradshaw, Larry; Close, Kelly; Collins, Brandon M.; Gleason, Paul; Hao, Wei Min; Langowski, Paul; McGinely, John; McHugh, Charles W.; Martinson, Erik; Omi, Phillip N.; Shepperd, Wayne; Zeller, Karl 2003. Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire. In: Graham, Russell T., Technical Editor. Hayman Fire Case Study. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-114. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 33-35

 


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