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Publication Information

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Title: Ethanol and (-)-a-pinene: attractants for bark and ambrosia beetles in southeastern USA.

Author: Miller, D. R.; Rabaglia, R. J.

Date: 2009

Source: Journal of Chemical Ecology

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description:

In 2002–2004, we examined the flight responses of 49 species of native and exotic bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae and Platypodidae) to traps baited with ethanol and/or (−)-α-pinene in the southeastern US. Eight field trials were conducted in mature pine stands in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Funnel traps baited with ethanol lures (release rate, about 0.6 g/day at 25–28°C) were attractive to ten species of ambrosia beetles (Ambrosiodmus tachygraphus, Anisandrus sayi, Dryoxylon onoharaensum, Monarthrum mali, Xyleborinus saxesenii, Xyleborus affinis, Xyleborus ferrugineus, Xylosandrus compactus, Xylosandrus crassiusculus, and Xylosandrus germanus) and two species of bark beetles (Cryptocarenus heveae and Hypothenemus sp.). Traps baited with (−)-α-pinene lures (release rate, 2–6 g/day at 25–28°C) were attractive to five bark beetle species (Dendroctonus terebrans, Hylastes porculus, Hylastes salebrosus, Hylastes tenuis, and Ips grandicollis) and one platypodid ambrosia beetle species (Myoplatypus flavicornis). Ethanol enhanced responses of some species (Xyleborus pubescens, H. porculus, H. salebrosus, H. tenuis, and Pityophthorus cariniceps) to traps baited with (−)-α-pinene in some locations. (−)-α-Pinene interrupted the response of some ambrosia beetle species to traps baited with ethanol, but only the response of D. onoharaensum was interrupted consistently at most locations. Of 23 species of ambrosia beetles captured in our field trials, nine were exotic and accounted for 70–97% of total catches of ambrosia beetles. Our results provide support for the continued use of separate traps baited with ethanol alone and ethanol with (−)-α-pinene to detect and monitor common bark and ambrosia beetles from the southeastern region of the US.

Keywords: Dendroctonus . Ethanol . Exotic species . Host attractant . Hylastes . Hypothenemus . Ips . Kairomone .Myoplatypus . α-Pinene . Platypodidae . Scolytidae . Xyleborinus . Xyleborus . Xylosandrus

Publication Notes:

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Citation:


Miller, D.R., Rabaglia, R.J. 2009. Ethanol and (-)-a-pinene: attractants for bark and ambrosia beetles in southeastern USA. Journal of Chemical Ecology 35:435-448.

 


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