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Title: Site conditions, fire, and root disease: Leptographium sp. and Heterobasidion annosum paradigms. pp. 122-127. M. Garbelotto & P. Gontheir (Editors). Proceedings 12th International Conference on Root and Butt Rots of Forest Trees.

Author: Otrosina, W. J.; Kliejunas, J. T.; Sung, S-J. S.; Maloney, P.; Spaine, P. C.

Date: 2008

Source: Research Note RMRS-RN-10. Fort Collins, CO: USDA-Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 6 p.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description:

Forest tree species have evolved under climatic, geological, and biological forces over eons of time. Root disease fungi, particularly root rotting Basidiomycetes are key drivers of coniferous forest ecosystems. They have coevolved with their hosts under the pressure of these forces, and as such, are ideally in some state of equilibrium with them. Nonetheless, there are Significant departures from the notion that native root disease fungi function in the same manner under many present forest conditions as they did prior to anthropogenic influences upon the forest landscape. These cases are often unpredictable and bring about significant ecological consequences. For example, fire reintroduction in fire suppressed conifer stands has unplanned pathological consequences. Issues such ~s decades of fire exclusion and fire reintroduction also have implications vis-a-vis Heterobasidion annosum root disease in Sequoia giganteum ecosystems. With respect to other root infecting fungi, our research showed an association of delayed mortality in longleaf pine with presence of Leptographium terebrantis, L procerum, and other Ophiostomatoid pathogens, even after relatively cool bums. These fungal species are not considered virulent and longleaf pine is generally considered resistant to many diseases. These examples of unintended pathological consequences of management actions are a small number of -many.

Publication Notes:

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Otrosina, W.J., Kliejunas, J.T., Sung, S-J. S.,Maloney, P., Spaine, P.C. 2008. Site conditions, fire, and root disease: Leptographium sp. and Heterobasidion annosum paradigms. pp. 122-127. M. Garbelotto & P. Gontheir (Editors). Proceedings 12th International Conference on Root and Butt Rots of Forest Trees. The University of California, Berkeley, USA. 268 pp.

 


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