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Publication Information

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Title: Guiding concepts for protected area stewardship in an era of global environmental change

Author: Hobbs, R.J.; Cole, D.N.; Yung, L.; Zavaleta, E.S.; Aplet, G.H.; Chapin, F.S.; Landres, P.B.; Parsons, D.J.; Stephenson, N.L.; White, P.S.; Graber, D.M.; Higgs, E.S.; Millar, C.I.; Randall, J.M.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Woodley, S.

Date: 2009

Source: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. E-View pre-print, Dec 2, 2009

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description: The major challenge to stewardship of protected areas is to decide where, when, and how to intervene in physical and biological processes, to conserve what we value in these places. To make such decisions, planners and managers must articulate the purposes of parks, what is valued, and what needs to be sustained more clearly. A key aim for conservation today is the maintenance and restoration of biodiversity, but a broader range of values are also likely to be considered important, including ecological integrity, resilience, historical fidelity (ie the ecosystem appears and functions much as it did in the past), and autonomy of nature. Until recently, the concept of “naturalness” was the guiding principle when making conservation-related decisions in park and wilderness ecosystems. However, this concept is multifaceted and often means different things to different people, including notions of historical fidelity and autonomy from human influence. Achieving the goal of nature conservation intended for such areas requires a clear articulation of management objectives, which must be geared to the realities of the rapid environmental changes currently underway. We advocate a pluralistic approach that incorporates a suite of guiding principles, including historical fidelity, autonomy of nature, ecological integrity, and resilience, as well as managing with humility. The relative importance of these guiding principles will vary depending on management goals and ecological conditions.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Hobbs, R.J.; Cole, D.N.; Yung, L.; Zavaleta, E.S.; Aplet, G.H.; Chapin, F.S.; Landres, P.B.; Parsons, D.J.; Stephenson, N.L.; White, P.S.; Graber, D.M.; Higgs, E.S.; Millar, C.I.; Randall, J.M.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Woodley, S. 2009. Guiding concepts for protected area stewardship in an era of global environmental change. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. E-View preprint, Dec 2, 2009.

 


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