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Publication Information

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Title: Use of saltcedar vegetation by landbirds migrating through the Bosque Del Apache National Wildlife Refuge

Author: Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Finch, Deborah M.

Date: 1999

Source: In: Finch, Deborah M.; Whitney, Jeffrey C.; Kelly, Jeffrey, F.; Loftin, Samuel R. Rio Grande ecosystems: linking land, water, and people: Toward a sustainable future for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. 1998 June 2-5; Albuquerque, NM. Proc. RMRS-P-7. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 222-230.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: We compared diversity, abundance and energetic condition of migrant landbirds captured in four different vegetation types in the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. We found lower species diversity among migrants caught in exotic saltcedar vegetation than in native willow or cottonwood. In general, Migrants were most abundant in agricultural edge and least abundant in cottonwood. There were no consistent patterns in energetic condition of common species among vegetation types. Ninety percent of statistical tests for variation in mass and fat score among vegetation types showed no significant difference. The few significant tests indicated that (1) Chipping Sparrows caught in saltcedar tended to be in poorer energetic condition than those caught in other vegetative types; (2) Ruby-crowned Kinglets captured in saltcedar tended to be in better energetic condition than those in other vegetative types; (3) The relationship between energetic condition of Wilson's Warbler's and vegetation type varied with year and season. The mixed evidence we report on the effects of exotic saltcedar on migrant birds parallels the existing literature on this topic. It is important to consider the configuration of vegetation types on the landscape when evaluating the effects of saltcedar on migrant birds.

Keywords: Rio Grande Basin, conservation, watershed, endangered species, sensitive species, restoration

Publication Notes:

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
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Citation:


Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Finch, Deborah M. 1999. Use of saltcedar vegetation by landbirds migrating through the Bosque Del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. In: Finch, Deborah M.; Whitney, Jeffrey C.; Kelly, Jeffrey, F.; Loftin, Samuel R. Rio Grande ecosystems: linking land, water, and people: Toward a sustainable future for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. 1998 June 2-5; Albuquerque, NM. Proc. RMRS-P-7. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 222-230.

 


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