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Publication Information

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Title: Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)

Author: Cartron, Jean-Luc E.; Kennedy, Patricia L.; Yaksich, Rob; Stoleson, Scott H.

Date: 2010

Source: In: Cartron, Jean-Luc, ed. Raptors of New Mexico. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press. p. 177-193.

Publication Series: Not categorized

Description: The Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) is intermediate in size between the Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) and the Sharp-shinned Hawk (A. striatus), northern North America's other two accipiters. The two sexes are almost alike in plumage, but as in both of the other species, the female is noticeably larger. According to Wheeler and Clark (1995), a female Cooper's Hawk has a mean body length of 45 cm (18 in) (range: 42-47cm [16-19 in]), amean wingspan of84 cm (33 in) (range: 79-87 cm [31-34 in]), and a mean body weight of 528 g (19 oz) (range: 479-678 g [17-24 oz]). This is in contrast to the male's mean length of 39 cm (15 in) (range: 37-41 cm [14-16 in]), wingspan Of73 cm (29 in) (range: 70-77 cm [28-30 in]), and body weight of 341 g (12 oz) (range: 302-402 g [10-14 oz]). The size difference is typically sufficient to tell male and female Cooper's Hawks apart. However, because the female Sharp-shinned Hawk approaches in size the male Cooper's Hawk, distinguishing between the two can be quite difficult in the field. Identification of juvenile accipiters to species is particularly daunting, and juvenile Cooper's Hawks can be confused with the juveniles of both other species.in the field. Identification of juvenile accipiters to species is particularly daunting, and juvenile Cooper's Hawks can be confused with the juveniles of both other species. motion can provide good long-distance identification clues when viewing Turkey Vultures through binoculars or a spotting scope.

Keywords: Cooper's Hawk, Accipiter cooperii, raptors, New Mexico

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Citation:


Cartron, Jean-Luc E.; Kennedy, Patricia L.; Yaksich, Rob; Stoleson, Scott H. 2010. Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii). In: Cartron, Jean-Luc, ed. Raptors of New Mexico. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press. p. 177-193.

 


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