Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(280 KB)

Title: Soil incorporation of logging residue affects fine-root and mycorrhizal root-tip dynamics of young loblolly pine clones

Author: Pritchard, Seth G.; Maier, Chris A.; Johnsen, Kurt H.; Grabman, Andrea J.; Chalmers, Anne P.; Burke, Marianne K.

Date: 2010

Source: Tree Physiology 30:1299–1310

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description: Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations cover a large geographic area of the southeastern USA and supply a large proportion of the nation’s wood products. Research on management strategies designed to maximize wood production while also optimizing nutrient use efficiency and soil C sequestration is needed. We used minirhizotrons to quantify the effects of incorporating logging residues into soil on fineroot standing crop, production and mortality, and mycorrhizal root tips in young loblolly pine clones of contrasting ideotypes. Clone 93 is known to allocate more C to stem growth, while clone 32 allocates less C to stems and more to leaves. The relative allocation by these clones to support fine-root turnover is unknown. Clone 32 exhibited 37% more fine-root mortality than clone 93, which was mainly the result of a greater standing crop of fine roots. Fine-root standing crop in plots amended with logging residue was initially higher than control plots, but 2.5 years after planting, standing crop in control plots had exceeded that in mulched plots. Production of mycorrhizal root tips, on the other hand, was initially higher in control than mulched plots, but during the last 9 months of the study, mycorrhizal tip production was greater in mulched than control plots, especially for clone 93. As expected, turnover rate of fine roots was greater in surface soil (0–25 cm) compared with deeper (25–50 cm) soil and for small roots (<0.4 mm diameter) compared with larger fine roots (0.4–2.0 mm diameter). Rates of fine-root turnover were similar in both clones. Organic matter additions reduced survivorship of individual roots and increased turnover rates of fine-root populations. Results indicate that management decisions should be tailored to fit the growth and allocation patterns of available clones.

Keywords: loblolly pine, fine roots, root turnover, survivorship, soil management, C sequestration

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Pritchard, Seth G.; Maier, Chris A.; Johnsen, Kurt H.; Grabman, Andrea J.; Chalmers, Anne P.; Burke, Marianne K. 2010. Soil incorporation of logging residue affects fine-root and mycorrhizal root-tip dynamics of young loblolly pine clones. Tree Physiology 30:1299–1310.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.