Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(387 KB)

Title: Forest ecohydrological research in the 21st century: what are the critical needs?

Author: Vose, James M.; Sun, Ge; Ford, Chelcy R.; Bredemeier, Michael; Ostsuki, Kyoichi; Wei, Adam; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zang, Lu.

Date: 2011

Source: Ecohydrology 4(2):146-158

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description: Modern ecohydrologic science will be critical for providing the best information to policy makers and society to address water resource challenges in the 21st century. Implicitly, ecohydrology involves understanding both the functional interactions among vegetation, soils, and hydrologic processes at multiple scales and the linkages among upland, riparian, and aquatic components. In this paper, we review historical and contemporary ecohydrologic science, focusing on watershed structure and function and the threats to watershed structure and function. Climate change, land use change, and invasive species are among the most critical contemporary issues that affect water quantity and quality, and a mechanistic understanding of watershed ecosystem structure and function is required to understand their impacts on water quantity and quality. Economic and social values of ecosystem services such as water supply from forested watersheds must be quantified in future research, as land use decisions that impact ecohydrologic function are driven by the interplay among economic, social, political, and biological constraints. Future forest ecohydrological research should focus on: (1) understanding watershed responses to climate change and variability, (2) understanding watershed responses to losses of native species or additions of non-native species, (3) developing integrated models that capitalize on long-term data, (4) linking ecohydrologic processes across scales, and (5) managing forested watersheds to adapt to climate change. We stress that this new ecohydrology research must also be integrated with socio-economic disciplines. Published in 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

Keywords: contemporary issues, climate change, critical hydrologic functions, forest ecohydrology, research needs

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Vose, James M.; Sun, Ge; Ford, Chelcy R.; Bredemeier, Michael; Ostsuki, Kyoichi; Wei, Adam; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zang, Lu. 2011. Forest ecohydrological research in the 21st century: what are the critical needs? Ecohydrology 4(2):146-158.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.