Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(962 KB)

Title: Coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, susceptibility and response to goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus, injury in southern California

Author: Coleman, Tom W.; Grulke, Nancy E.; Daly, Miles; Godinez, Cesar; Schilling, Susan L.; Riggan, Philip J.; Seybold, Steven J.

Date: 2011

Source: Forest Ecology and Management 261(11): 1852-1865

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description: Oak mortality is often associated with a complex of decline factors. We describe the morphological and physiological responses of coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia Née, in California to an invasive insect, the goldspotted oak borer (GSOB), Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), and evaluate drought as a potential inciting factor. Morphological traits of 356 trees were assessed and physiological traits of 70 of these were monitored intensively over one growing season. Morphological characteristics of tree health included crown thinning and dieback; bole staining resulting from larval feeding; density of GSOB adult exit holes; and holes caused by woodpecker feeding. These characteristics were used to rank GSOB infestation/injury into four classes, and taken together, they explained 87% of the variation in a principal component analysis. Drought stress on various size/age and infestation classes of Q. agrifolia was measured by assessing branchlet pre-dawn and solar noon xylem water potential, leaf cell turgor potential, and water use efficiency over one growing season. Both morphological and physiological traits were highly variable in mature and old growth trees. Early summer plant water status (branchlet xylem water potential and water use efficiency) was similar between uninfested and newly colonized trees, suggesting that GSOB are not pre-selecting drought-stressed Q. agrifolia for oviposition. By late summer, leaf water and cell turgor potentials were lower in infested than in uninfested mature trees, suggesting that GSOB infestation causes drought stress in these trees. Among the tree size/age classes, infested old growth trees exhibited the greatest change in water use efficiency over the growing season, and showed greater morphological injury symptoms of decline than infested mature trees. Morphological attributes of decline in Q. agrifolia associated with GSOB were correlated weakly with increasing physiological drought stress among infestation classes of trees. We propose that the collection of morphological responses of Q. agrifolia to GSOB described here can be used to monitor the future expansion of the GSOB distribution as well as the GSOB-induced decline of Q. agrifolia in California.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Coleman, Tom W.; Grulke, Nancy E.; Daly, Miles; Godinez, Cesar; Schilling, Susan L.; Riggan, Philip J.; Seybold, Steven J. 2011. Coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, susceptibility and response to goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus, injury in southern California, Forest Ecology and Management, Volume 261, Issue 11, Pages 1852-1865, DOI: 10.1016/j.foreco.2011.02.008.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.