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Publication Information

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Title: The canopy horizontal array turbulence study

Author: Patton, Edward G.; Horst, Thomas W.; Sullivan, Peter P.; Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Brown, William O. J.; Burns, Sean P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Held, Andreas; Karl, Thomas; Mayor, Shane D.; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Spuler, Scott M.; Sun, Jielun; Turnipsee, Andrew A.; Allwine, Eugene J.; Edburg, Steven L.; Lamb, Brian K.; Avissar, Roni; Calhoun, Ronald J.; Kleissl, Jan; Massman, William J.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Weil, Jeffrey C.

Date: 2011

Source: Bulletin American Meteorological Society. 92: 593-611.

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description: Vegetation covers nearly 30% of Earth's land surface and influences climate through the exchanges of energy, water, carbon dioxide, and other chemical species with the atmosphere (Bonan 2008). The Earth's vegetation plays a critical role in the hydrological, carbon, and nitrogen cycles and also provides habitat and shelter for biota that deliver essential ecosystem services, such as pollination. In addition, living foliage produces a variety of chemical compounds that can significantly influence the oxidation capacity (cleansing ability) of the atmosphere (e.g., Fuentes et al. 2000; Guenther et al. 2006) and global aerosol distributions (e.g., Hallquist et al. 2009). Plant-atmosphere interactions can also have negative effects with billions of dollars each year lost from wind damage to forests and crops. Therefore, understanding the processes controlling vegetation-atmosphere exchange at the most fundamental level is of critical importance for weather, climate, and environmental forecasting as well as for agricultural and natural resource management.

Keywords: turbulence, large eddy simulations, boundary layer, vegetation, field experiments, In situ observations

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Patton, Edward G.; Horst, Thomas W.; Sullivan, Peter P.; Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Brown, William O. J.; Burns, Sean P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Held, Andreas; Karl, Thomas; Mayor, Shane D.; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Spuler, Scott M.; Sun, Jielun; Turnipsee, Andrew A.; Allwine, Eugene J.; Edburg, Steven L.; Lamb, Brian K.; Avissar, Roni; Calhoun, Ronald J.; Kleissl, Jan; Massman, William J.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Weil, Jeffrey C. 2011. The canopy horizontal array turbulence study. Bulletin American Meteorological Society. 92: 593-611.

 


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