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Publication Information

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Title: Multilocus genotypes indicate differentiation among Puccinia psidii populations from South America and Hawaii

Author: Graca, R. N.; Alfenas, A. C.; Ross-Davis, A. L.; Klopfenstein, Ned; Kim, M. -S.; Peever, T. L.; Cannon, P. G.; Uchida, J. Y.; Kadooka, C. Y.; Hauff, R. D.

Date: 2011

Source: In: Fairweather, Mary Lou; Palacios, Patsy, comps. Proceedings of the 58th Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; 2010 October 4-8; Valemount, BC. Flagstaff, AZ: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, AZ Zone Forest Health. p. 131-134.

Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

Description: Puccinia psidii is the cause of rust disease of many host species in the Myrtaceae family, including guava (Psidium spp.), eucalypt (Eucalyptus spp.), rose apple (Syzygium jambos), and 'ohi'a (Metrosideros polymorpha). First reported in 1884 on guava in Brazil, the rust has since been detected in South America (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Venezuela), Central America (Costa Rica and Panama), Caribbean (Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad and Tobago, and Virgin Islands), Mexico, USA (Florida, California, and Hawaii), Japan, and most recently it was potentially found in Australia. Of present concern is the recent introduction of the pathogen to Hawaii, where it infects an endemic tree species known as 'ohi'a, the dominant tree species in Hawaii's remaining native forests. The rust also poses serious threats to several Myrtaceae species including Eucalyptus, a genus native to Australia and planted extensively in numerous tropical and subtropical countries. Despite the potential threat toward many forest ecosystems worldwide and the expanding geographic range of this disease, little is known about the genetic structure of P. psidii populations, migratory routes and sources of introductions.

Keywords: Puccinia psidii, Myrtaceae

Publication Notes:

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Citation:


Graca, R. N.; Alfenas, A. C.; Ross-Davis, A. L.; Klopfenstein, N. B.; Kim, M. -S.; Peever, T. L.; Cannon, P. G.; Uchida, J. Y.; Kadooka, C. Y.; Hauff, R. D. 2011. Multilocus genotypes indicate differentiation among Puccinia psidii populations from South America and Hawaii. In: Fairweather, Mary Lou; Palacios, Patsy, comps. Proceedings of the 58th Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; 2010 October 4-8; Valemount, BC. Flagstaff, AZ: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, AZ Zone Forest Health. p. 131-134.

 


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