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Publication Information

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Title: Some ecological, economic, and social consequences of bark beetle infestations

Author: Progar, Robert A.; Eglitis, Adris; Lundquist, John E.

Date: 2009

Source: In: Hayes, J.L.; Lundquist, J.E., comps 2009. The Western Bark Beetle Research Group: a unique collaboration with Forest Health Protection-proceedings of a symposium at the 2007 Society of American Foresters conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-784. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 71-83

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Bark beetles are powerful agents of change in dynamic forest ecosystems. Most assessments of the effects of bark beetle outbreaks have been based on negative impacts on timber production. The positive effects of bark beetle activities are much less well understood. Bark beetles perform vital functions at all levels of scale in forest ecosystems. At the landscape level they influence forest regeneration, and at the stand level they kill mature trees thus creating gaps and forest openings that are beneficial to wildlife. They also cause overall increases in forest and stand resiliency by promoting variability in sizes and ages of trees and in species compositions. The effects of bark beetles on forest ecosystems differ with beetle species, geographical location, host species, stand density and tree age. Whereas ecological consequences are normally beneficial to forest ecosystems, socioeconomic perceptions range from positive to negative. We provide several examples from western regions that illustrate ecological, economic, or social effects of bark beetle outbreaks. These examples include information on management of bark beetle outbreaks and identify research needs for the future.

Keywords: Bark beetles, beetle impact, socioeconomic perception

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Citation:


Progar, Robert A.; Eglitis, Adris; Lundquist, John E. 2009. Some ecological, economic, and social consequences of bark beetle infestations. In: Hayes, J.L.; Lundquist, J.E., comps 2009. The Western Bark Beetle Research Group: a unique collaboration with Forest Health Protection-proceedings of a symposium at the 2007 Society of American Foresters conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-784. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 71-83

 


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