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Title: Acetophenone as an anti-attractant for the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

Author: Erbilgin, N.; Gillette, N.E.; Mori, S.R.; Stein, J.D; Owen, D.R.; Wood, D.L.

Date: 2007

Source: J. Chem. Ecol. 33:817–823

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description: Abstract Host location and colonization by bark beetles is dependent upon the relative and absolute amounts of attractant and antiattractant compounds available. Many investigations have lead to use of antiattractants for the management of these pests and have been especially focused on verbenone. However, recent studies have identified new antiattractants for several species of bark beetles. We report results of recent investigations of the response of western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte, to two recently identified antiattractants, acetophenone, and fenchyl alcohol, with verbenone as a standard of comparison, in northern California. Release of both acetophenone and verbenone resulted in significantly lower trap catches of D. brevicomis in aggregation pheromonebaited traps, while fenchyl alcohol was inactive. Acetophenone was the only antiattractant that did not reduce numbers of the most abundant predator of D. brevicomis, Temnochila chlorodia (Mannerheim), responding to the attractant pheromone of its prey. Aggregation pheromone-baited traps with acetophenone also had the highest predator/prey ratio. Our results suggest that acetophenone may be part of the intra- and interspecific interactions among sympatric species of bark beetles and may have application in their control.

Keywords: Acetophenone, Verbenone, Fenchyl alcohol, Antiattractants, Bark beetles, Predatorsine

Publication Notes:

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Erbilgin, N.; Gillette, N.E.; Mori, S.R.; Stein, J.D; Owen, D.R.; Wood, D.L. 2007. Acetophenone as an anti-attractant for the western Acetophenone as an anti-attractant for the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). J. Chem. Ecol. 33:817–823

 


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