Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(365 KB)

Title: Reconstructing fire history in central Mongolia from tree-rings

Author: Hessl, Amy E.; Ariya, Uyanga; Brown, Peter; Byambasuren, Oyunsannaa; Green, Tim; Jacoby, Gordon; Sutherland, Elaine Kennedy; Nachin, Baatarbileg; Maxwell, R. Stockton; Pederson, Neil; De Grandpre, Louis; Saladyga, Thomas; Tardif, Jacques C.

Date: 2012

Source: International Journal of Wildland Fire. 21(1): 86-92.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Rising temperatures are expected to increase wildfire activity in many regions of the world. Over the last 60 years in Mongolia, mean annual temperatures have increased ~2°C and the recorded frequency and spatial extent of forest and steppe fires have increased. Few long records of fire history exist to place these recent changes in a historical perspective. The purpose of this paper is to report on fire history research from three sites in central Mongolia and to highlight the potential of this region as a test case for understanding the relationships between climate change, fire and land use. We collected partial cross-sections from fire-scarred trees and stumps at each site using a targeted sampling approach. All three sites had long histories of fire ranging from 280 to 450 years. Mean Weibull fire return intervals varied from 7 to 16 years. Fire scars at one protected-area site were nearly absent after 1760, likely owing to changes in land use. There is limited synchrony in fire occurrence across sites, suggesting that fire occurrence, at least at annual time scales, might be influenced by local processes (grazing, human ignitions, other land-use factors) as well as regional processes like climate. Additional data are being collected to further test hypotheses regarding climate change, land use and fire.

Keywords: climate change, forest-steppe, land use

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Hessl, Amy E.; Ariya, Uyanga; Brown, Peter; Byambasuren, Oyunsannaa; Green, Tim; Jacoby, Gordon; Sutherland, Elaine Kennedy; Nachin, Baatarbileg; Maxwell, R. Stockton; Pederson, Neil; De Grandpre, Louis; Saladyga, Thomas; Tardif, Jacques C. 2012. Reconstructing fire history in central Mongolia from tree-rings. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 21(1): 86-92.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.