Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(197 KB)

Title: A comparative gradient approach as a tool for understanding and managing urban ecosystems

Author: Boone, Christopher G.; Cook, Elizabeth; Hall, Sharon J.; Nation, Marcia L.; Grimm, Nancy B.; Raish, Carol B.; Finch, Deborah M.; York, Abigail M.

Date: 2012

Source: Urban Ecosystems. doi: 10.1007/s11252-012-0240-9

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description: To meet the grand challenges of the urban century - such as climate change, biodiversity loss, and persistent poverty - urban and ecological theory must contribute to integrated frameworks that treat social and ecological dynamics as interdependent. A socioecological framework that encapsulates theory from the social and ecological sciences will improve understanding of metropolitan dynamics and generate science for improved, sustainable management of urban ecosystems. To date, most urban ecological research has focused on single cities. A comparative approach that uses gradients within and between cities is a useful tool for building urban ecological theory. We offer five hypotheses that are testable using a comparative, gradient approach: (i) the current size, configuration, and function of larger metropolitan ecosystems predicts the potential trajectory of smaller urban areas; (ii) timing of growth explains the greatest variance in urban ecosystem structure and function; (iii) form and function of urban ecosystems are converging over time; (iv) urban ecosystems become more segregated and fragmented as populations increase; and (v) larger cities are more innovative than smaller cities in managing urban ecosystems.

Keywords: comparative urbanism, gradients, spatial heterogeneity, convergence, city size, neighborhood age

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Boone, Christopher G.; Cook, Elizabeth; Hall, Sharon J.; Nation, Marcia L.; Grimm, Nancy B.; Raish, Carol B.; Finch, Deborah M.; York, Abigail M. 2012. A comparative gradient approach as a tool for understanding and managing urban ecosystems. Urban Ecosystems. doi: 10.1007/s11252-012-0240-9

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.