Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(148 KB)

Title: Listening and learning from traditional knowledge and western science: A dialogue on contemporary challenges of forest health and wildfire

Author: Mason, Larry; White, Germaine; Morishima, Gary; Alvarado, Ernesto; Andrew, Louise; Clark, Fred; Durglo, Mike Sr.; Durglo, Jim; Eneas, John; Erickson, Jim; Friedlander, Margaret; Hamel, Kathy; Hardy, Colin; Harwood, Tony; Haven, Faline; Isaac, Everett; James, Laurel; Kenning, Robert; Leighton, Adrian; Pierre, Pat; Raish, Carol; Shaw, Bodie; Smallsalmon, Steven; Stearns, Vernon; Teasley, Howard; Weingart, Matt; Wilder, Spus

Date: 2012

Source: Journal of Forestry. 110(4): 187-193.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Native Americans relied on fire to maintain a cultural landscape that sustained their lifeways for thousands of years. Within the past 100 years, however, policies of fire exclusion have disrupted ecological processes, elevating risk of wildfire, insects, and disease, affecting the health and availability of resources on which the tribes depend. On Indian Reservations, tribal forest plans include prescribed fire to restore and maintain the lands. Public land managers are now considering ways to restore the fire-based ecosystem, but tribal knowledge about the use and effects of fire has largely been left out of the discussion. For 2 days in June 2010, 7 tribal elders joined with 20 native and nonnative scientists, resource managers, and academics to explore ways to integrate Native American stewardship practices, traditional knowledge, and philosophies with western science to address contemporary forest health and wildfire challenges. The workshop, convened on the Flathead Indian Reservation of the Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes located in western Montana, provided a forum for candid dialogue and knowledge sharing. This article, coauthored by all 27 participants, offers a summary background followed by candid highlights of dialogue along with recommendations for progress based on lessons learned. The central conclusion is that integration and application of traditional knowledge with western science for improved stewardship of natural resources will require enduring commitments to knowledge sharing that extend beyond the usual boundaries of professional training and cultural orientation such that learning can proceed, legacy myths might be corrected, and the forests and the people will benefit.

Keywords: fire history, traditional knowledge, indigenous knowledge, Native American forestry, forest fuels

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Mason, Larry; White, Germaine; Morishima, Gary; Alvarado, Ernesto; Andrew, Louise; Clark, Fred; Durglo, Mike, Sr.; Durglo, Jim; Eneas, John; Erickson, Jim; Friedlander, Margaret; Hamel, Kathy; Hardy, Colin; Harwood, Tony; Haven, Faline; Isaac, Everett; James, Laurel; Kenning, Robert; Leighton, Adrian; Pierre, Pat; Raish, Carol; Shaw, Bodie; Smallsalmon, Steven; Stearns, Vernon; Teasley, Howard; Weingart, Matt; Wilder, Spus. 2012. Listening and learning from traditional knowledge and western science: A dialogue on contemporary challenges of forest health and wildfire. Journal of Forestry. 110(4): 187-193.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.