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Title: Locating Spatial Variation in the Association between Wildland Fire Risk and Social Vulnerability across Six Southern States

Author: Poudyal, N.; Johnson-Gaither, C.; Goodrick, S.; Bowker, J.M.; Gan, J.

Date: 2012

Source: Environmental Management 49(3):623-635

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description: Wildland fire in the South commands considerable attention, given the expanding wildland urban interface (WUI) across the region. Much of this growth is propelled by higher income retirees and others desiring natural amenity residential settings. However, population growth in the WUI increases the likelihood of wildfire fire ignition caused by people, as humans account for 93% of all wildfires fires in the South. Coexisting with newly arrived, affluent WUI populations are working class, poor or otherwise socially vulnerable populations. The latter groups typically experience greater losses from environmental disasters such as wildfire because lower income residents are less likely to have established mitigation programs in place to help absorb loss. We use geographically weighted regression to examine spatial variation in the association between social vulnerability (SOVUL) and wildfire risk. In doing so, we identify ‘‘hot spots’’ or geographical clusters where SOVUL varies positively with wildfire risk across six Southern states—Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina. These clusters may or may not be located in the WUI. These hot spots are most prevalent in South Carolina and Florida. Identification of these population clusters can aid wildfire managers in deciding which communities to prioritize for mitigation programming.

Keywords: Wildland fire risk,  Social vulnerability, Environmental hazards,  Southeastern U.S., Geographically weighted regression

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Poudyal, N.; Johnson-Gaither, C.; Goodrick, S.; Bowker, J.M.; Gan, J. 2012. Locating Spatial Variation in the Association between Wildland Fire Risk and Social Vulnerability across Six Southern States. Environmental Management 49(3):623-635.

 


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