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Title: Using organic fertilizers in forest and native plant nurseries

Author: Landis, Thomas D.; Dumroese, R. Kasten

Date: 2012

Source: In: Haase, D. L.; Pinto, J. R.; Riley, L. E., tech. coords. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2011. Proc. RMRS-P-68. Fort Collins, CO: USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 45-52.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Since World War II, synthetic fertilizers have been used almost exclusively to grow forest and native plant nursery crops because they are quickly soluble and readily taken up by crops, producing the rapid growth rates that are necessary in nursery culture. In recent years, however, a wide variety of new organic fertilizers have become available. We divided these organics into three categories: 1) animal and plant wastes that are sustainable, and can further be separated into unprocessed and processed materials; 2) natural minerals that are unsustainable, with their use regulated in strict organic farming; and 3) a blend of waste material supplemented with natural minerals. Mineral nutrients are released more slowly by organic fertilizers and crops will therefore take longer to reach commercial size. This slow nutrient release rate has other benefits, however, such as less chance of water pollution and better establishment of beneficial microorganisms. In the final analysis, high quality nursery crops can be grown with organic fertilizers, but production schedules will have to be adjusted.

Keywords: nutrient release rate, nutrient uptake, nutrient analysis, pollution, mycorrhizae

Publication Notes:

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Citation:


Landis, Thomas D.; Dumroese, R. Kasten. 2012. Using organic fertilizers in forest and native plant nurseries. In: Haase, D. L.; Pinto, J. R.; Riley, L. E., tech. coords. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2011. Proc. RMRS-P-68. Fort Collins, CO: USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 45-52.

 


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