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Title: Phosphorus translocation by red deer on a subalpine grassland in the central European Alps

Author: Schutz, Martin; Risch, Anita C.; Achermann, Gerald; Thiel-Egenter, Conny; Page-Dumroese, Deborah; Jurgensen, Martin F.; Edward, Peter J.

Date: 2006

Source: Ecosystems. 9: 624-633.

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description: We examined the role of red deer (Cervus elaphus L.) in translocating phosphorus (P) from their preferred grazing sites (short-grass vegetation on subalpine grasslands) to their wider home range in a subalpine grassland ecosystem in the Central European Alps. Phosphorus was used because it is the limiting nutrient in these grasslands. When we compared P removal of aboveground biomass due to grazing with P input due to the deposit of feces on a grid of 268 cells (20 m x 20 m) covering the entire grassland, we detected distinct spatial patterns: the proportion of heavily grazed short-grass vegetation increased with increasing soil-P pool, suggesting that red deer preferably grazed on grid cells with a higher soil-P pool. Biomass consumption related to increased proportion of shortgrass vegetation, and therefore P removal, increased with increasing soil-P pool. However, within the two vegetation types (short-grass and tall-grass), consumption was independent from soil-P pool. In addition, P input rates from defecation increased with increasing soil-P pool, resulting in a constant mean net P loss of 0.083 kg ha-1 y-1 (0.03%-0.07% of soil-P pool) independent of both soil-P pool and vegetation type. Thus, there was no P translocation between grid cells with different soil-P pools or between short-grass and tall-grass vegetation. Based on these results, it is likely that the net rate of P loss is too small to explain the observed changes in vegetation composition from tall-herb/meadow communities to short-grass and from tall-grass to short-grass on the grassland since 1917. Instead, we suggest that the grazing patterns of red deer directly induced succession from tall-herb/meadow communities to short-grass vegetation. Yet, it is also possible that long-term net soil-P losses indirectly drive plant succession from short-grass to tall-grass vegetation, because nutrient depletion could reduce grazing pressure in short-grass vegetation and enable the characteristic tall-grass species Carex sempervirens Vill. to establish.

Keywords: Cervus elaphus, elimination pattern, grazing pattern, phosphorus removal/input, succession, Swiss National Park

Publication Notes:

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Schutz, Martin; Risch, Anita C.; Achermann, Gerald; Thiel-Egenter, Conny; Page-Dumroese, Deborah; Jurgensen, Martin F.; Edward, Peter J. 2006. Phosphorus translocation by red deer on a subalpine grassland in the central European Alps. Ecosystems. 9: 624-633.

 


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