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Publication Information

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Title: Modeling the effects of harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline in a Central Hardwood Forest landscape

Author: Wang, Wen J.; He, Hong S.; Spetich, Martin A.; Shifley, Stephen R.; Thompson, Frank R. III; Fraser, Jacob S.

Date: 2013

Source: PLoS ONE. 8(6): e66713.

Publication Series: Journal/Magazine Article (JRNL)

Description: Oak decline is a process induced by complex interactions of predisposing factors, inciting factors, and contributing factors operating at tree, stand, and landscape scales. It has greatly altered species composition and stand structure in affected areas. Thinning, clearcutting, and group selection are widely adopted harvest alternatives for reducing forest vulnerability to oak decline by removing susceptible species and declining trees. However, the long-term, landscape-scale effects of these different harvest alternatives are not well studied because of the limited availability of experimental data. In this study, we applied a forest landscape model in combination with field studies to evaluate the effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline in a Central Hardwood Forest landscape. Results showed that the potential oak decline in high risk sites decreased strongly in the next five decades irrespective of harvest alternatives. This is because oak decline is a natural process and forest succession (e.g., high tree mortality resulting from intense competition) would eventually lead to the decrease in oak decline in this area. However, forest harvesting did play a role in mitigating oak decline and the effectiveness varied among the three harvest alternatives. The group selection and clearcutting alternatives were most effective in mitigating oak decline in the short and medium terms, respectively. The long-term effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline became less discernible as the role of succession increased. The thinning alternative had the highest biomass retention over time, followed by the group selection and clearcutting alternatives. The group selection alternative that balanced treatment effects and retaining biomass was the most viable alternative for managing oak decline. Insights from this study may be useful in developing effective and informed forest harvesting plans for managing oak decline.

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Citation:


Wang, Wen J.; He, Hong S.; Spetich, Martin A.; Shifley, Stephen R.; Thompson, Frank R. III; Fraser, Jacob S. 2013. Modeling the effects of harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline in a Central Hardwood Forest landscape. PLoS ONE. 8(6): e66713.

 


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