Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(423 KB)

Title: Relationships among climate, forests, and insects in North America: Examples of the importance of long-term and broad-scale perspectives

Author: Trotter, Talbot.

Date: 2013

Source: In: Camp, Ann E.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Carroll, Charles J.W. Long-term silvicultural and ecological studies. Results for science and management: volume 2.GISF Res. Pap. 013. New Haven, CT: Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry: 161-177.

Publication Series: Book Chapter

Description: Forest structure is strongly influenced by disturbance, agents of which can include fire, weather, mammals, annelids, fungi, insects, and increasingly with the advent of the Anthropocene, climate. Currently, climate change represents one of the broadest threats to natural systems, including forests, with the potential to directly alter forest structure and function through mechanisms such as drought induced tree mortality (Allen et al., 2010), changes in tree species distribution (Allen and Breshears, 1998; Neilson and Marks, 1994), density (Allen et al., 2010), and composition (Allen and Breshears, 1998; Mueller et al., 2005). Although the direct effects of climate on trees often produce the most readily apparent changes to forested systems (i.e. tree mortality), climatic variation has the potential to indirectly alter forests by changing community interactions, including mycorrhizal associations (Gehring et al., 1998; Gehring and Whitham, 1994), insect outbreak dynamics (McCloskey et al., 2009; Otvos et al., 1979; Santos and Whitham, 2010; White, 1976), and arthropod community structure (Trotter III, 2008).

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Trotter, Talbot. 2013. Relationships among climate, forests, and insects in North America: Examples of the importance of long-term and broad-scale perspectives. In: Camp, Ann E.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Carroll, Charles J.W. Long-term silvicultural and ecological studies. Results for science and management: volume 2.GISF Res. Pap. 013. New Haven, CT: Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry: 161-177.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.