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Title: Post-wildfire erosion in the Chiricahua Mountains

Author: Youberg, Ann; Neary, Daniel G.; Koestner, Karen A.; Koestner, Peter E.

Date: 2013

Source: In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Gebow, Brooke S.; Eskew, Lane G.; Collins, Loa C. Merging science and management in a rapidly changing world: Biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago III and 7th Conference on Research and Resource Management in the Southwestern Deserts; 2012 May 1-5; Tucson, AZ. Proceedings. RMRS-P-67. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 357-361.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The Horseshoe 2 Fire burned 90,226 ha (222,954 ac) of the Chiricahua Mountains in the Coronado National Forest of southeast Arizona from May 8 to June 25, 2011. This mountain range in the Madrean Archipelago was burned by widespread fires prior to 1890, numerous small fires after 1890, and, more recently, the 11,129 ha (27,500 ac) Rattlesnake Fire in 1994. The latter fire resulted in significant erosion during post-fire monsoon storms that eroded deep gullies (~10 m) in Ward Canyon (upper West Turkey Creek). Post-fire runoff deposited large amounts of sediment in lower channels, particularly in Rucker Creek and in Rucker Lake. The Horseshoe 2 Fire burned approximately 70% of the mountain range with a mosaic of fire severities. Post-fire erosion from floods and debris flows produced additional erosion and sedimentation that is currently being evaluated through fieldwork and repeat aerial photography. This paper discusses ongoing work regarding post-fire erosion and the impacts on channel systems in the Chiricahua Mountains.

Keywords: Madrean Archipelago, Sky Islands, southwestern United States, northern Mexico, natural environment, fauna, flora, research, management, biodiversity, climate change

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Youberg, Ann; Neary, Daniel G.; Koestner, Karen A.; Koestner, Peter E. 2013. Post-wildfire erosion in the Chiricahua Mountains. In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Gebow, Brooke S.; Eskew, Lane G.; Collins, Loa C. Merging science and management in a rapidly changing world: Biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago III and 7th Conference on Research and Resource Management in the Southwestern Deserts; 2012 May 1-5; Tucson, AZ. Proceedings. RMRS-P-67. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 357-361.

 


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