Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(88 KB)

Title: Leave islands as refugia for low-mobility species in managed forest mosaics

Author: Wessell-Kelly, Stephanie J.; Olson, Deanna H.

Date: 2013

Source: In: Anderson, P.D.; Ronnenberg, K.L., eds. Density management in the 21st century: west side story. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-880. Portland, OR: US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 123-123.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: In recent years, forest management in the Pacifi c Northwest has shifted from one based largely on resource extraction to one based on ecosystem management principles. Forest management based on these principles involves simultaneously balancing and sustaining multiple forest resource values, including silvicultural, social, economic, and ecological objectives. Leave islands, or green-tree retention clusters, have been proposed as an alternative silvicultural strategy designed to sustain the ecological integrity and biological diversity within intensively managed forests. However, pertinent questions regarding the relationship of the physical structure of leave islands to their associated microclimates, fl ora, and fauna remain largely unanswered. We evaluated the effectiveness of three sizes of leave islands (0.1-, 0.2-, and 0.4-ha) within a thinned forest matrix relative to thinned and unthinned forest in providing refugia for low-mobility, ecologically sensitive species one to fi ve years following forest thinning. Specifi cally, we examined differences in microhabitat and amphibian, mollusk, arthropod, and vascular plant abundance and diversity with respect to the size of leave islands in managed forests. By determining habitat correlates of species and functional group occurrence, we envision that this study will provide vital information regarding aggregated green-tree retention in managed forest landscapes. Our results indicate that there are treatment eff ects of forest thinning and leave islands relative to microclimate and some aspects of amphibian and arthropod density, and vascular plant diversity and ground cover. Th ese results suggest that leave islands may represent an effective sustainable forest management strategy by providing shortterm refugia for some species in managed forests of the Pacific Northwest, U.S.A.

Keywords: microclimate, amphibians, mollusks, arthropods, plants.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Wessell-Kelly, Stephanie J.; Olson, Deanna H. 2013. Leave islands as refugia for low-mobility species in managed forest mosaics. In: Anderson, P.D.; Ronnenberg, K.L., eds. Density management in the 21st century: west side story. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-880. Portland, OR: US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 123-123.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.