Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(51 KB bytes)

Title: Prevention of Cold Damage to Container-Grown Longleaf Pine Roots

Author: Tinus, Richard W.; Sword, Mary Anne; Barnett, James P.

Date: 2002

Source: In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-56. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 55-57

Publication Series: Not categorized

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: When longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings are container-grown in open fields, their roots may be exposed to damaging, cold temperatures. Major losses in some nurseries have occurred. Between November 1996 and February 1997, we measured the cold hardiness of container-grown longleaf pine roots by measuring electrolyte leakage (a) of greenhouse-grown and growth-chamber hardened seedlings representing minimum and maximum cold hardiness, respectively, and (b) of outdoor grown seedlings. Minimum tolerable root temperature was 25 °F, which varied little with season; a few degrees lower was lethal. Weather records at the W.W. Ashe Nursery near Brooklyn, MS, showed that damaging temperatures occurred on 7 nights per year on average. Covering the seedlings with black plastic overnight held rootball temperatures 10 to 12 °F above ambient air temperature and saved the crop twice in December 1996. However, the best management strategy is to outplant seedlings before the onset of damaging, cold temperatures because once outplanted, the seedlings are safe.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Tinus, Richard W.; Sword, Mary Anne; Barnett, James P. 2002. Prevention of Cold Damage to Container-Grown Longleaf Pine Roots. In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-56. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 55-57

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.