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Title: Species richness, abundance, and composition of hypogeous and epigeous ectomycorrhizal fungal sporocarps in young, rotation-age, and old-growth stands of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in the Cascade Range of Oregon, U.S.A.

Author: Smith, J.E.; Molina, R.; Huso, M.M.P.; Luoma, D.L.; McKay, D.; Castellano, M.A.; Lebel, T.; Valachovic, Y.

Date: 2002

Source: Canadian Journal of Botany. 80: 186-204

Publication Series: Not categorized

Description: Knowledge of the community structure of ectomycorrhizal fungi among successional forest age-classes is critical for conserving fungal species diversity. Hypogeous and epigeous sporocarps were collected from three replicate stands in each of three forest age-classes (young, rotation-age, and old-growth) of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) dominated stands with mesic plant association groups. Over four fall and three spring seasons, 48 hypogeous and 215 epigeous species or species groups were collected from sample areas of 6300 and 43 700 m2, respectively. Cumulative richness of hypogeous and epigeous species was similar among age-classes but differed between seasons. Thirty-six percent of the species were unique to an age-class: 50 species to old-growth, 19 to rotation-age, and 25 to young stands. Seventeen species (eight hypogeous and nine epigeous) accounted for 79% of the total sporocarp biomass; two hypogeous species, Gautieria monticola Harkn., and Hysterangium crassirhachis Zeller and Dodge, accounted for 41%. Average sporocarp biomass in young and rotation-age stands compared with old growth stands was about three times greater for hypogeous sporocarps and six times greater for epigeous sporocarps. Average hypogeous sporocarp biomass was about 2.4 times greater in spring compared with fall and for epigeous sporocarps about 146 times greater in fall compared with spring. Results demonstrated differences in ectomycorrhizal fungal sporocarp abundance and species composition among successional forest age-classes.

Keywords: ectomycorrhizal fungi, sporocarp production, forest succession, Pseudotsuga menziesii, Tsuga heterophylla zone, biodiversity

Publication Notes:

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Smith, J.E.; Molina, R.; Huso, M.M.P.; Luoma, D.L.; McKay, D.; Castellano, M.A.; Lebel, T.; Valachovic, Y. 2002. Species richness, abundance, and composition of hypogeous and epigeous ectomycorrhizal fungal sporocarps in young, rotation-age, and old-growth stands of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in the Cascade Range of Oregon, U.S.A. Canadian Journal of Botany. 80: 186-204

 


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