Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(848 KB bytes)

Title: Managing for featured, threatened, endangered, and sensitive species and unique habitats for ecosystem sustainability.

Author: Marcot, Bruce G.; Wisdom, Michael J.; Li, Hiram W.; Castillo, Gonzalo C.

Date: 1994

Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-329. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 39 p. (Everett, Richard L., assessment team leader; Eastside forest ecosystem health assessment; Hessburg, Paul F., science team leader and tech. ed., Volume III: assessment.)

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

Description: The traditional approach to wildlife management has focused on single species—historically game species and more recently threatened and endangered species. Several newer approaches to managing for multiple species and biological diversity include managing coarse filters, ecological indicator species, indicator guilds, and use of species-habitat matrices. These and other modeling approaches each have strong points as well as weak points, which include conflicts among objectives for species with disparate needs. We present three case examples of integrating management for single species with management for multiple species and ecosystems. These examples are: managing elk habitat in the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon; managing for sustainable native fish faunas in eastern Oregon and Washington; and managing plant and animal species closely associated with old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest. Each case illustrates a unique set of considerations and ecological conditions. Successful integration of species and ecosystem management depends on clearly defining objectives at several scales of time and space, and not violating the three most basic principles of ecosystem management: maintaining or restoring biodiversity, maintaining long-term site productivity, and maintaining sustainable use of renewable resources.

Keywords: Wildlife habitat, fish habitat, biodiversity, eastside, threatened species, endangered species, sensitive species, management indicator species, species planning

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Marcot, Bruce G.; Wisdom, Michael J.; Li, Hiram W.; Castillo, Gonzalo C. 1994. Managing for featured, threatened, endangered, and sensitive species and unique habitats for ecosystem sustainability. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-329. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 39 p. (Everett, Richard L., assessment team leader; Eastside forest ecosystem health assessment; Hessburg, Paul F., science team leader and tech. ed., Volume III: assessment.)

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.