Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(400 K bytes)

Title: Composition and development of reproduction in two-age Appalachian hardwood stands: 20-year results

Author: Miller, Gary W.; Kochenderfer, James N.; Fekedulegn, Desta

Date: 2004

Source: In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Eskew, Lane G., compilers. 2004. Silviculture in special places: Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop; 2003 September 8-11; Granby, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-34. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 171-181

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: In the early 1980s, silviculturists with the Northeastern Research Station and Monongahela National Forest envisioned that managing some Appalachian hardwood stands to promote two-age structures would be part of an effective strategy for managing multi-use forests. Two-age stands provided the light and seedbed conditions necessary for regenerating numerous desirable hardwood species and maintaining species diversity. The residual overstory trees also served to maintain vertical structure, mast production, wildlife habitat, and esthetic quality in visually sensitive areas. This paper examines the composition and development of approximately 20-year-old reproduction growing beneath 100-year-old residual overstory trees in two-age central Appalachian hardwood stands. After 20 years, the crowns of the residual overstory trees had expanded by nearly 80 percent and collectively covered almost half of the stand area. Desirable shade-intolerant species such as black cherry, northern red oak, and yellow-poplar in the new age class had remained competitive only in areas located between the crowns of the residual overstory trees. The areas located beneath the residual overstory trees were occupied by tolerant species such as sugar maple, red maple, and American beech. Data indicated that the residual overstory trees had a strong influence on the development and long-term species composition of reproduction. Practical alternatives for planning and implementing two-age management systems are discussed.

Keywords: Appalachian hardwood stands, two-age structures, residual overstory trees, two-age management systems

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rschneider@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Miller, Gary W.; Kochenderfer, James N.; Fekedulegn, Desta 2004. Composition and development of reproduction in two-age Appalachian hardwood stands: 20-year results. In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Eskew, Lane G., compilers. 2004. Silviculture in special places: Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop; 2003 September 8-11; Granby, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-34. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 171-181

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.