Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern
Help
 

GeoTreesearch


Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

(300 K bytes)

Title: Below-ground process responses to elevated CO2 and temperature: a discussion of observations, measurement methods, and models

Author: Pendall, Elise; Bridgham, Scott; Hanson, Paul J.; Hungate, Bruce; Kicklighter, David W.; Johnson, Dale W.; Law, Beverly E.; Luo, Yiqi; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Olsrud, Maria; Ryan, Michael G.; Wan, Shiqiang

Date: 2004

Source: New Phytologist. Vol. 162, no. 2 (May 2004). p. 311-322.

Publication Series: Not categorized

Description: Rising atmospheric CO2 and temperatures are probably altering ecosystem carbon cycling, causing both positive and negative feedbacks to climate. Below-ground processes play a key role in the global carbon (C) cycle because they regulate storage of large quantities of C, and are potentially very sensitive to direct and indirect effects of elevated CO2 and temperature. Soil organic matter pools, roots and associated rhizosphere organisms all have distinct responses to environmental change drivers, although availability of C substrates will regulate all the responses. Elevated CO2 increases C supply below-ground, whereas warming is likely to increase respiration and decomposition rates, leading to speculation that these effects will moderate one another. However, indirect effects on soil moisture availability and nutrient supply may alter processes in unexpected directions. Detailed, mechanistic understanding and modelling of below-ground flux components, pool sizes and turnover rates is needed to adequately predict long-term, net C storage in ecosystems. In this synthesis, we discuss the current status of below-ground responses to elevated CO2 and CO2 fertilization, mycorrhizas, nutrient cycling, rhizosphere, soil carbon, soil respiration, soil warming.

Keywords: carbon sequestration, CO2 fertilization, mycorrhizas, nutrient cycling, rhizosphere, soil carbon, soil respiration, soil warming

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Pendall, Elise; Bridgham, Scott; Hanson, Paul J.; Hungate, Bruce; Kicklighter, David W.; Johnson, Dale W.; Law, Beverly E.; Luo, Yiqi; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Olsrud, Maria; Ryan, Michael G.; Wan, Shiqiang 2004. Below-ground process responses to elevated CO2 and temperature: a discussion of observations, measurement methods, and models. New Phytologist. Vol. 162, no. 2 (May 2004). p. 311-322.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.