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Title: How important is a casino to a community and how important is a community to a casino: an empirical basis for cooperative marketing between casinos and community tourism promotion agencies

Author: Moufakkir, Omar; Holecek, Donald F.;

Date: 2003

Source: In: Schuster, Rudy, comp., ed. Proceedings of the 2002 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-302. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 184-189

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Cities, towns and communities have developed casinos for several reasons. The first of which is to: attract more tourists, remain competitive with other destinations and more fully utilize the existing tourism infrastructure; the second is to keep local money inside the local economy by giving residents the opportunity to gamble at home. Although several states have developed casinos in their respective jurisdictions, casino gaming remains a controversial economic and social activity. There has been rising debate with respect to the real value of casinos as an economic development tool, and much discourse has resulted from the political debate in jurisdictions still considering whether or not to legalize casinos. Gaming has opponents and advocates. Both parties provide arguments to support their position. Research on the impacts of casino gaming has indicated mixed results. This research examined the effect of non-local visitors to Detroit casinos on the local economy, based on visitors' spending. Additionally, a typology of casino gamers based on visitors' primary tip purpose was developed to indicate the relationship that exist between the casinos and other community tourism-related attractions. Results indicated that the gaming market is not homogeneous and that casino visitors spend money inside, as well as outside the casino in the community. This suggests that cooperative marketing between the casinos and other community tourism-related businesses and agencies is a key strategy for successful gaming development.

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Moufakkir, Omar; Holecek, Donald F. 2003. How important is a casino to a community and how important is a community to a casino: an empirical basis for cooperative marketing between casinos and community tourism promotion agencies. In: Schuster, Rudy, comp., ed. Proceedings of the 2002 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-302. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 184-189

 


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