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Title: Slow down, don't burn too fast... Got to make that old-growth last!

Author: Kush, John S.; Varner, J. Morgan; Meldahl, Ralph S.;

Date: 1998

Source: In: Proceedings of the 2nd Longleaf Alliance Conference; 1998 November 17-19; Charleston, SC. Longleaf Alliance Report No. 4. Auburn University, AL; Longleaf Alliance: 109-111.

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: Remaining old-growth longleaf pine acreage (1996): 3902 ha (9755 ac) Longleaf pine forests have been termed critically endangered, with less than three percent of its former area remaining. The remaining forest exists in a variety of conditions, ranging from pristine to highly degraded. For the degraded stands, ecokgiil restoration has,been employed to improve the structure and function of these forests. Methods of ecological restoration in longleaf pine forests have included a mixture of reintroducing fire, harvesting of hardwoods, thinning overstocked stands, planting of trees and herbs, and applying herbicides. Federal and state agencies, university researchers, forest industry, and conservation organizations are becoming more active in longleaf pine ecosystem restoration. While many experiments in restoring longleaf can be thought of as successes, mistakes need to be minimized. Restoration efforts have been underway in the Flomaton Natural Area since 1995. Some of the worries of this effort will be presented. We will present examples of problems encountered in the restoration process. By leaming from other efforts, we can improve the remaining acreage of longleaf forest, thereby restoring the diverse flora and fauna of this magnificent ecosystem.

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Kush, John S.; Varner, J. Morgan; Meldahl, Ralph S. 1998. Slow down, don''t burn too fast... Got to make that old-growth last!. In: Proceedings of the 2nd Longleaf Alliance Conference; 1998 November 17-19; Charleston, SC. Longleaf Alliance Report No. 4. Auburn University, AL; Longleaf Alliance: 109-111.

 


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