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Title: Quality and Quantity Evaluations of Shade Grown Forages

Author: Ladyman, K. P.; Kerley, M. S.; Kallenbach, R. L.; Garrett, H. E.; Van Sambeek, J. W.; Navarrete-Tindall, N. E.;

Date: 2003

Source: In: 8th North American Agroforestry Conference: Agroforestry and Riparian Buffers for Land Productivity and Environmental Stability; Corvallis, OR. [City, State: Publisher Unknown: 175-181

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Seven legumes were grown during the summer-fall of 2000, at the Horticulture and Agroforestry Research Center (39? 01 ' N, 92? 46' W) near New Franklin, MO. The forages were grown in 7.5L white pots placed on light-colored gravel either under full sunlight, 45% sunlight, or 20% sunlight created by a shade cloth over a rectangular frame. Drip irrigation was applied once a day. Forages were grown in a well-drained potting medium with a complete slow-release fertilizer. Forages were sown and germinated in the greenhouse between May 18 and June 14 and put outside into the shade study on June 21 to June 30. Forages were harvested in August and October. All forages were analyzed for their content of N (nitrogen), NDF (neutral detergent fiber), ADF (acid detergent fiber), and NDFIS (neutral detergent fiber in situ digestibility). Three of the legume species had greater (P>O.05) forage production at 45% than in full sunlight. As the percentage sunlight was decreased, most forage species studied had greater (P>0.05) concentrations of nitrogen and fiber. Fiber digestibility was higher (P>0.05) or unchanged (P>0.05) for most forage species as sunlight intensity was decreased. Several legume species have the potential to be used in a silvopastoral practice to improve forage productivity and quality as compared to an open pasture environment.

Keywords: fiber digestibility, light, forage quality

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Ladyman, K. P.; Kerley, M. S.; Kallenbach, R. L.; Garrett, H. E.; Van Sambeek, J. W.; Navarrete-Tindall, N. E. 2003. Quality and Quantity Evaluations of Shade Grown Forages. In: 8th North American Agroforestry Conference: Agroforestry and Riparian Buffers for Land Productivity and Environmental Stability; Corvallis, OR. [City, State: Publisher Unknown: 175-181

 


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