Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (360 KB)

Title: A Model Based Analysis of the Role of an Upper-Level Front and Stratospheric Intrusion in the Mack Lake Fire

Author: Zimet, Tarisa K.; Martin, Jonathan E.;

Date: 2003

Source: In: 2d International Wildland Fire Ecology and Fire Management Congress: 5th Symposium on Fire and Forest Meteorology; 2003 November 16-20; Orlando, FL. Boston, MA: American Meteorological Society: 1.3.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Meteorological assessment of wildfire risk has traditionally involved identification of several synoptic types empirically determined to influence wildfire spread. Such weather types are characterized by identifiable synoptic-scale structures and processes. Schroeder et. al. (1964) identified four recognizable synoptic-scale patterns that contribute most frequently to high fire danger over the Great Lakes Region. Two of these weather types, the Hudson Bay High, and the Northwest Canadian High, are regularly observed in conjunction with northwesterly flow at middle and upper tropospheric levels. Such synoptic-scale flow is often associated with the development of upper-level frontal zones and an attendant intrusion of stratospheric air into the troposphere. Properties of stratospheric air such as its high momentum, high values of potential vorticity and low water vapor content, can potentially contribute to fire danger and spread. It is also suggested that the high ozone mixing ratios often observed in the wake of wildfires may be the result of stratospheric intrusions. This paper will investigate the structure and physical processes associated with an upper-level front, which occurred in the vicinity of a documented fire, and propose a role for upper-frontal processes on wildfire behavior.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Zimet, Tarisa K.; Martin, Jonathan E. 2003. A Model Based Analysis of the Role of an Upper-Level Front and Stratospheric Intrusion in the Mack Lake Fire. In: 2d International Wildland Fire Ecology and Fire Management Congress: 5th Symposium on Fire and Forest Meteorology; 2003 November 16-20; Orlando, FL. Boston, MA: American Meteorological Society: 1.3.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.