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Title: Hemlock resources at risk in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Author: Johnson, Kristine D.; Hain, Fred P.; Johnson, Katherine S.; Hastings, Felton;

Date: 2000

Source: In: McManus, Katherine A.; Shields, Kathleen S.; Souto, Dennis R., eds. Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in eastern North America. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-267. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 111-112.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr) is the dominant species in a variety of sites in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Hemlock covers approximately 3820 acres (1528 hectares) or one percent of the Park, which at 524,856 acres is the largest area managed as wilderness in the eastern United States. Since timber was never harvested in about 20% of the Park, many of the hemlock areas are virgin forests containing trees exceeding 400 years of age. From 1992-1995, Park resource managers began to identify, map, and gather baseline information on hemlock forests. Approaching infestations of hemlock woolly adelgid provided some urgency for this inventory. In addition, the fauna of hemlock forests are virtually unknown. In 1996, the Park began a cooperative project with NC State University to develop survey methods for arthropods associated with hemlock. Knowledge of species present, seasonal abundance, natural variations in abundance and locations of rare species will be fundamental in decisions regarding the use of insecticides or biological controls against HWA. Baseline information gathered prior to infestation will assist Park managers in evaluating changes in the ecosystem and potential restoration efforts.

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Citation:


Johnson, Kristine D.; Hain, Fred P.; Johnson, Katherine S.; Hastings, Felton 2000. Hemlock resources at risk in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In: McManus, Katherine A.; Shields, Kathleen S.; Souto, Dennis R., eds. Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in eastern North America. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-267. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 111-112.

 


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