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Publication Information

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Title: Seasonal distribution of the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) in Southwestern Alberta

Author: Collister, Douglas M.;

Date: 1997

Source: In: Duncan, James R.; Johnson, David H.; Nicholls, Thomas H., eds. Biology and conservation of owls of the Northern Hemisphere: 2nd International symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-190. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 119-122.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Great Gray Owls (Strix nebulosa) have been banded and monitored west of Calgary in the foothills of Alberta from 1986 to 1996. Thirty-six adult owls have been banded: 16 males, 16 females and 4 of unknown sex. Great Gray Owls were captured during every month except August and October although the majority (56 percent) were banded from March-May (n=18). Four birds have been recaptured to date. A male was caught in the same location on 23 March and 9 May of 1986, a female was caught in the same location on 31 May 1987 and 18 November 1989, a female banded on 26 December 1988 was road-killed 14 km SSE on 19 September 1992, and a male banded on 17 June 1989 was recaptured 15 km NNE on 20 May 1990. Evidence of winter (non-breeding) territoriality has been observed. Seasonal change in abundance, indicative of a significant movement of birds into or out of the study area, has not been observed. Due to sub-regional variations in topography and climate, the study area encompasses a wide range of habitat types including muskeg, mature upland poplar-spruce mixed forest, old-growth riparian spruce forest and grasslands. The diversity inherent in this landscape appears to satisfy year-round habitat requirements for the Great Gray Owl, precluding a requirement for this species to exhibit large-scale seasonal migratory movements.

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Citation:


Collister, Douglas M. 1997. Seasonal distribution of the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) in Southwestern Alberta. In: Duncan, James R.; Johnson, David H.; Nicholls, Thomas H., eds. Biology and conservation of owls of the Northern Hemisphere: 2nd International symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-190. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 119-122.

 


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