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Title: A Sensitivity Analysis of a Map of Habitat Quality for the California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) in southern California

Author: Hines, Ellen M.; Franklin, Janet;

Date: 1997

Source: In: Duncan, James R.; Johnson, David H.; Nicholls, Thomas H., eds. Biology and conservation of owls of the Northern Hemisphere: 2nd International symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-190. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 218-236.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Using a Geographic Information System (GIS), a sensitivity analysis was performed on estimated mapping errors in vegetation type, forest canopy cover percentage, and tree crown size to determine the possible effects error in these data might have on delineating suitable habitat for the California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) in southern California. The maps were developed as part of a project to map existing vegetation for the USDA Forest Service in southern California using Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite data, and GIS modeling. The research area is the San Bernardino National Forest, the largest contiguous area of spotted owl habitat in southern California, with a large and thoroughly surveyed spotted owl population. Map error was estimated using error matrices based on comparing the final map output to expert photo interpretation of a number of locations. The simulation of map uncertainty resulted in an increase in suitable habitat area with changes in vegetation classification. There was no significant increase in the number of actual known spotted owl locations found with modeled areas of suitable habitat. Fragmentation analysis of the additional patches showed a possibility that the additional patches were too small and fragmented to be useful as actual habitat areas. This research will generate different map realizations for a population model being developed for the USDA Forest Service.

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Citation:


Hines, Ellen M.; Franklin, Janet 1997. A Sensitivity Analysis of a Map of Habitat Quality for the California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) in southern California. In: Duncan, James R.; Johnson, David H.; Nicholls, Thomas H., eds. Biology and conservation of owls of the Northern Hemisphere: 2nd International symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-190. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 218-236.

 


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