Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (200 KB)

Title: Owl broadcast surveys in the Foothills Model Forest, Alberta, Canada

Author: Takats, D. Lisa; Holroyd, Geoffrey L.;

Date: 1997

Source: In: Duncan, James R.; Johnson, David H.; Nicholls, Thomas H., eds. Biology and conservation of owls of the Northern Hemisphere: 2nd International symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-190. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 421-431.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Broadcast surveys are used to determine the presence and relative abundance of nocturnal owls, but there has been little effort to standardize such surveys. This paper examines broadcast survey data collected in 1995 and 1996 in the Foothills Model Forest, Alberta, Canada. Three hundred calls from six species of owls were recorded at 893 stops for a call rate of 0.34 calls per stop. Moon phase significantly affected the rate of owls calls. Owl call rate was significantly lower in the middle of the night (midnight to 3:59) compared to the early night (20:00 to 23:59) and early morning (4:00 to 7:59). During precipitation and strong wind, fewer owls called spontaneously or responded to the playback calls. Call rate of owls also declined with temperature. Owls called significantly more frequently during the 2 minute listening period beginning each 15 minute survey period than in subsequent listening periods after playback. Four behavioral responses to playback were recorded: calling and approaching, silently approaching and calling, silently approaching and not calling, and calling but not approaching.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Takats, D. Lisa; Holroyd, Geoffrey L. 1997. Owl broadcast surveys in the Foothills Model Forest, Alberta, Canada. In: Duncan, James R.; Johnson, David H.; Nicholls, Thomas H., eds. Biology and conservation of owls of the Northern Hemisphere: 2nd International symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-190. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 421-431.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.