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Title: Projection matrices as a forest management tool: an invasive tree case study

Author: Renne, Ian J.; Tracy, Benjamin F.; Spira, Timothy P.;

Date: 2003

Source: In: Van Sambeek, J. W.; Dawson, Jeffery O.; Ponder Jr., Felix; Loewenstein, Edward F.; Fralish, James S., eds. Proceedings of the 13th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-234. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 367

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Life history parameters of many forest-dwelling species are affected by native and non-native pests. In turn, these pests alter forest processes and cost the United States billions of dollars annually. Population projection matrices can aid ecologists and managers in evaluating the impact of pests on forest species as well as devising effective strategies for pest control. As a case study, we use stage-classified projection matrices to assess the annual growth of five Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb.) populations and to evaluate the population growth consequences of simulated mortality among different stage classes. Four of five populations had positive annual growth over a 3-year interval and the growth average of all population-by-year matrices was +12 ? 5 percent. The effectiveness of management strategies differed such that the same strategy applied to all populations often resulted in differential local control. However, two of the same strategies were most effective in every population. It is thus important to know the demography of pest populations when control efforts are considered. We conclude by discussing how these adaptable models can be applied to common management issues. Examples include what should be done when immediate intervention is needed but life histories are not known, and how to achieve control objectives by using multiple management strategies.

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Renne, Ian J.; Tracy, Benjamin F.; Spira, Timothy P. 2003. Projection matrices as a forest management tool: an invasive tree case study. In: Van Sambeek, J. W.; Dawson, Jeffery O.; Ponder Jr., Felix; Loewenstein, Edward F.; Fralish, James S., eds. Proceedings of the 13th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-234. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 367

 


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