Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (77 KB)

Title: Burning for birds: concepts and applications

Author: Engstrom, R. Todd; Brownlie, David J.;

Date: 2002

Source: In: Ford, W. Mark; Russell, Kevin R.; Moorman, Christopher E., eds. Proceedings: the role of fire for nongame wildlife management and community restoration: traditional uses and new directions. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-288. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station: 58-64.

Publication Series: Other

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Prescribed fire is being used extensively for habitat management of non-game birds, although the area burned today is small relative to the amount of land that burned historically. Results of a non-scientific questionnaire of public and private land managers in the eastern U.S. revealed prescribed fire is being used to provide winter, breeding season, and migration habitat for at least 57 species of birds in 29 states. Increasingly sophisticated application of fire will be necessary to manage habitat for diverse bird species and other organisms. Contemporary training courses on the use of prescribed fire typically divide ecological effects of fire on animals into two categories: direct effects alter the animals' physical condition and indirect effects are mainly associated with changes in habitat. The envirogram, a conceptual tool developed by Andrewartha and Birch (1984) within their theory of the environment, can be used to diagram multiple direct and indirect effects of fire on bird species. Variables of prescribed fire (i.e., ignition pattern, season, frequency, etc.) can be matched within the envirogram to achieve the desired management objectives for individual species. We used a modified envirogram to examine how prescribed fire is used in intensive management for the northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) within the Red Hills of north Florida and south Georgia. A coarse-grained approach to management involving multiple species or an ecosystem may be more efficient and sustainable than emphasis on a single species.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Engstrom, R. Todd; Brownlie, David J. 2002. Burning for birds: concepts and applications. In: Ford, W. Mark; Russell, Kevin R.; Moorman, Christopher E., eds. Proceedings: the role of fire for nongame wildlife management and community restoration: traditional uses and new directions. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-288. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station: 58-64.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.