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Title: Wild harvests from Scottish woodlands: an exploration of the health and well-being of non-timber forest products collection and use

Author: Martin, Suzanne; Emery, Marla; Dyke, Alison;

Date: 2005

Source: In: Gallis, C. Proceedings of first Europen Cost E39 conference: forests, trees, health, and well-being. Thessaloniki, Greece: National Agriculture Research, Forest Research Institute: [inclusive pages unknown]

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Small-scale gathering of nontimber forest products (NTFPs) - wild edibles, medicinals, craft materials, etc. - has a range of benefits which have a specific bearing on the health and well-being of gatherers in contemporary Scottish society. The information discussed in this paper is drawn from qualitative research which focused on identifying and understanding the social, cultural and economic values associated with the collection and use of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) in Scotland. In particular it showed how the collection and consumption of NTFPs provides gatherers with physical health benefits arising from activities such as walking and basket making and the consumption of products rich in vitamins and minerals. It also illustrates how NTFPs contribute to the mental well-being of collectors by providing a source of joy and passion, feelings of self fulfillment and worth, and of human and personal identity. This well-being derived from the development of intimate bonds with the natural environment, family and friends - associations which may be regarded as especially poignant in a society in which the fragmentation of families, as well as a perceived disconnection between people and the natural environment, are concerns. A number of reflections are made on the relevance of these findings for policy and practice.

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Martin, Suzanne; Emery, Marla; Dyke, Alison 2005. Wild harvests from Scottish woodlands: an exploration of the health and well-being of non-timber forest products collection and use. In: Gallis, C. Proceedings of first Europen Cost E39 conference: forests, trees, health, and well-being. Thessaloniki, Greece: National Agriculture Research, Forest Research Institute: [inclusive pages unknown]

 


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