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Title: Evaluation of candidate insecticides for control of the nantucket pine tip moth (Lepidoptera:Tortricidae)

Author: Dalusky, Mark J.; Berisford, C. Wayne;

Date: 1999

Source: In: Proceedings of an informal Conference The entomological Society of America, Annual Meeting, December 12-16, Atlanta, Georgia, eds. Berisford, C. Wayne; Grosman, Donald M., 14-19

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Initial screening in 1995 compared the efficacy of Capture®, Dimlin®, Foray®, Mimid®, Neema®, Pounce®, and Tempo® in controlling infestation by the Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock). Orthene®TTO, Tame® and a tank-mix of the two were added to the trials in 1996. All compounds tested were significantly better than the check regarding infestation of terminal and top whorl shoots by Nantucket pine tip moth. All sprays were timed for a contacttype insecticide, unless otherwise stated, following the methods of Berisford and others (1984), using degree-day accumulation triggered by male moth flight. In the Piedmont, the pyrethroids Tempo®, Capture® and Pounce® and the insect growth regulator (IGR) Mimid performed best with Dimlin®, Neem® and Foray® being somewhat less effective. Test results from the Alabama Coastal Plain were similar with Foray® joining the top group. In 1996, Neem® and Dimlin® were dropped in favor of Orthenet® and Tame® alone and in combination. All treatments in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont tests were significantly better than control plots. Only two sprays (1 of Foray® and 1 of Orthene® applied on a contact timing) failed to limit infestation in the top whorl below 10 percent. On an epidemic Virginia site, all treatments were significantly better than controls with the pyrethroids. Orthen&Eame mixtures and Foray® plus a UV screen grouping together followed by the various tank-mixes and Foray® minus the UV screen. In 1997, Warrioa, a pyrethroid, was tested against third and fourth generation tip moth in the upper Coastal Plain of Georgia. Top whorl infestation was held below 5 percent for both generations compared to a mean of 30 percent for Pounce@. In 1998, Imidan, an organophosphate, was tested at 2 rates for control of second generation Nantucket pine tip moth on a Piedmont site near Athens, GA. Control was excellent being at or near zero percent infestation in treatment plots.

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Dalusky, Mark J.; Berisford, C. Wayne 1999. Evaluation of candidate insecticides for control of the nantucket pine tip moth (Lepidoptera:Tortricidae). In: Proceedings of an informal Conference The entomological Society of America, Annual Meeting, December 12-16, Atlanta, Georgia, eds. Berisford, C. Wayne; Grosman, Donald M., 14-19

 


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