Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (923 KB bytes)

Title: Effects of Prescribed Fire on Live Trees and Snags in Eastside Pine Forests in California

Author: Laudenslayer, William F.;

Date: 1997

Source: Proceedings of the Symposium. Fire in California Ecosystems: Integrating Ecology, Prevention and Management November 17-20,1997 San Diego, CA

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: Snags are important to forests because they contribute to the developinent, maintenance, and productivity of' soils and provide habitat for an array of life fornls. Historically, fire has played an irnportant role in shaping the composition and structure of many forests in the western IJnited States and fire is now being reintroduced to restore the natural process. However, the effect of firc: on the snag resource is not well known and responses may differ depending on the length of time between fires. Preliminary data from two frres in eastside pine forests, burning after a long fire-fiee interval, suggest that fire-killed trees deteriorate at faster rates than trees dying from other causes and fires remove many of the existing snags. Of 14 trees dying after a prescribed bum in 1990, eight lost large portions of their tops by 1997. In an unburned plot, only six of 21 trees dying in that period lost large portions of their tops. Eight trees on the burned plot lost more than 10 percent of their bark, whereas none of the trees on the unburned plot lost even 10 percent of their bark, In an area burned in 1995, 39 of 71 snags survived the burn but some were heavily scorched or incurred other damage from the fire. These results suggest that fire may have a great effect on the characteristics and numbers of snags in eastside pine forests. However, additional studies are necessary to determine if these results are typical of a more frequent fire regimes.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Laudenslayer, William F. 1997. Effects of Prescribed Fire on Live Trees and Snags in Eastside Pine Forests in California. Proceedings of the Symposium. Fire in California Ecosystems: Integrating Ecology, Prevention and Management November 17-20,1997 San Diego, CA

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.