Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (880.0 KB bytes)

Title: Prescribed fires are not created equal: fire season and severity effects in ponderosa pine forests of the southern Blue Mountains.

Author: Thompson, Jonathan.;

Date: 2006

Source: Science Findings 81. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 5 p

Publication Series: Science Findings

Description: In the mid-1990s, forest managers on the Malheur National Forest were concerned about their prescribed fire program. Although they have only a few weeks of acceptable conditions available in the spring and fall, they were worried that spring-season prescribed burning might be exacerbating black stain root disease and having negative effects on understory plants.

Working closely with forest managers, PNW Research Station scientists designed an experiment tailored to the problem. Prescribed fires were set in the fall and spring. The stands were then monitored for several years to determine the response of understory plants, black stain root disease development, and ponderosa pine tree mortality. Although more trees died in fires set in the fall, the season of burn did not really matter. What did matter was the severity of fire and the amount of damage to the trees. There was also no evidence that burn season influenced the understory native perennial (longlived) grasses and forbs. However, exotic and native short-lived species were more abundant in the areas burned in the fall. As with tree mortality patterns, fire severity is probably driving this pattern. Short-lived native plants showed postfire invasion and spread patterns similar to exotics, but exotics were more abundant than natives.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Thompson, Jonathan. 2006. Prescribed fires are not created equal: fire season and severity effects in ponderosa pine forests of the southern Blue Mountains. Science Findings 81. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 5 p

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.