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Title: Effects of soil compaction on root and root hair morphology: implications for campsite rehabilitation

Author: Alessa, L.; Earnhart, C. G.;

Date: 2000

Source: In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 5: Wilderness ecosystems, threats, and management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-5. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 99-104

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Recreational use of wild lands can create areas, such as campsites, which may experience soil compaction and a decrease in vegetation cover and diversity. Plants are highly reliant on their roots’ ability to uptake nutrients and water from soil. Any factors that affect the highly specialized root hairs (“feeder cells”) compromise the overall health and survival of the plant. We report here initial data in our investigation of how of soil compaction affects plant roots, using the common bean as a dicot model. Soil compaction decreases overall plant growth and causes changes in root hair morphology and the F-actin cytoskeleton, critical to the function of root hairs. In addition, rates of cytoplasmic streaming, which facilitate nutrient and water uptake, are reduced in root hairs from compacted treatments. When plants were removed from compacted soils, higher amounts of total C, N and Ca were found compared to those of controls. We discuss these data in the context of rehabilitation methods in impacted wilderness areas.

Keywords: Wilderness, recreation, campsites, soil compaction, roots, rehabilitation

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Alessa, L.; Earnhart, C. G. 2000. Effects of soil compaction on root and root hair morphology: implications for campsite rehabilitation. In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 5: Wilderness ecosystems, threats, and management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-5. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 99-104

 


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