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Title: A multiscale method for assessing vegetation baseline of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in protected areas of Chile

Author: Pauchard, Anibal; Ugarte, Eduardo; Millan, Jaime;

Date: 2000

Source: In: McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 3: Wilderness as a place for scientific inquiry; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-3. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 111-116

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The exponential growth of recreation and tourism or ecotourism activities is affecting ecological processes in protected areas of Chile. In order to protect protected areas integrity, all projects inside their boundaries must pass through the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). The purpose of this research was to design a multiscale method to assess vegetation for the EIA baseline in protected areas of Chile and developing countries. The data obtained could be used to indicate patterns of biodiversity of the ecosystem at different scales, and at the same time monitor changes due to human activity. The method was applied in Conguillío National Park, in South Central Chile. Three scales of vegetation characterization were used. They are complementary and can be modified depending on the sensitivity of the ecosystem, the intensity of impacts and the human resources and technology available. Our method proved to be efficient in characterizing ecosystem diversity at different scales. We encourage the use of this multiscale method to assess vegetation baseline in protected areas.

Keywords: wilderness, protected areas, recreation, tourism, ecotourism, ecosystems, biodiversity, vegetation, monitoring, human impacts, Chile

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Pauchard, Anibal; Ugarte, Eduardo; Millan, Jaime 2000. A multiscale method for assessing vegetation baseline of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in protected areas of Chile. In: McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 3: Wilderness as a place for scientific inquiry; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-3. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 111-116

 


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